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  • Pain Processes in Tennis Elbow Illuminated by PET Scanning

    Source: Science Daily
    Physiological processes in soft tissue pain such as chronic tennis elbow can be explored using diagnostic imaging methods. This is demonstrated by researchers from Uppsala University and the results are now being published in the prestigious journal PLOS ONE. The pain physician and researcher Magnus Peterson is presenting a new use of positron emission tomography (PET) and a tracer for the signal receptor NK1 for visualising a physiological process associated with pain.

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  • When exercising, women have greater shortness of breath than men

    Source: Medical News Today
    The reason women find it harder to breathe than men during exercise is due to greater electrical activation of their breathing muscles, It is well established that women experience greater shortness of breath during physical activity, from stair climbing to long-distance running, than men of a similar age. This is true in healthy young and older adults, as well as in patients with chronic heart and lung disease. This study is the first to explain why this happens.

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  • Healthier Hearts After Joint Surgery

    Source: dailyRx
    For patients with arthritis, joint replacement surgery could mean more than relief from pain and stiffness. It might protect against heart disease too. These researchers found that joint surgery significantly reduced arthritis patients' risk of heart problems like heart attack and stroke. The authors of the study suggested that the surgery may have allowed patients to become more physically active, thus protecting them from heart disease.

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  • Knee Braces for Osteoarthritis Treatment

    Source: dailyRx
    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint issue for middle-aged and older adults. The good news is that there may be a simple solution to help patients deal with the pain. A recent study examined the effectiveness of wearing a patellofemoral (the joint connecting the back of the knee cap and the thigh bone) knee brace for reducing knee pain and damaged bone marrow (tissue inside the bones).

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  • Surgeons describe new knee ligament

    Source: Medical News Today
    At the Belgian University Hospitals Leuven, two knee surgeons have for the first time given a full anatomical description of a new ligament that they term the anterolateral ligament (ALL). The new ligament is thought to play an important role in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears.

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  • Improper way of working out may do more harm than good

    Source: News Medical
    With the coming of the new year, many people will vow to get in shape after overindulging during the holidays. However, not knowing the proper way to work out might do more harm than good. Nearly 500,000 workout-related injuries occur each year. One reason is people want to do too much too fast and overuse their muscles. These injuries occur gradually and are often hard to diagnose in the bones, tendons and joints. Another reason is poor technique during weight and other training.

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  • Stem Cell Therapy Following Meniscus Knee Surgery May Reduce Pain, Restore Meniscus

    Source: ScienceDaily
    A single stem cell injection following meniscus knee surgery may provide pain relief and aid in meniscus regrowth, according to a novel study appearing in the January issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS). In the first-of-its-kind study, "Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Delivered via Intra-Articular Injection to the Knee, Following Partial Medial Meniscectomy," most patients who received a single injection of adult stem cells following the surgical removal of all or part of a torn meniscus, reported a significant reduction in pain.

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  • Secret to Fewer Doctor Office Visits After 70: Play High School Sports

    Source: ScienceDaily
    Seventy year olds who don't frequently visit the doctor have something unexpected in common -- most played high school sports. They were active on a team over 50 years ago and are more likely to be active into their late 70s.

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  • Overuse Injuries, Burnout in Youth Sports Can Have Long-Term Effects

    Source: ScienceDaily
    As an emphasis on competitive success in youth sports has led to intense training, frequent competition and early single sport specialization, overuse injuries and burnout have become common. Given these concerns, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) has released a new clinical report that provides guidance to physicians and healthcare professionals who provide care for young athletes.

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  • What Patients Need to Know About Revision Surgery After Hip or Knee Replacement

    Source: ScienceDaily
    Hundreds of thousands of hip and knee replacement surgeries are performed in the United States each year, and they are highly successful in eliminating pain, restoring mobility and improving quality of life.

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