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  • How to melt a frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis)

    Source: Fitness wellness News
    Those who suffer a frozen shoulder know it’s not easily shrugged off. Often, it’s not easily moved at all. Combined with a gripping pain and radiating aches, this condition really gets you in its clutches. Here are tips when you’re ready for a meltdown … Most never give a thought to their shoulders and all the mechanics involved for their daily functioning. Until one day, for seemingly no explanation at all, they demand attention. Although lifting a heavy object can trigger low back pain and an overstuffed pillow can kink your neck, the shoulder seems to suddenly protest for no reason. And when it does, don’t even think about a simple act like waving hello or flagging a taxi. A frozen shoulder also makes a lousy bed-partner. Dare to shift your arm the “wrong” way during the night, and it can interrupt sleep for hours with its complaining.

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  • Shoulder pain in the elderly

    Source: The Star Online
    Frozen shoulder is a common, sometimes painful, self-limiting condition that can be adequately managed in the primary care setting. SHOULDER pain commonly affects daily activities, and subsequently, the quality of life of our Malaysian seniors. While elderly people are more likely to experience pain than the general population, in many instances, they are under-treated. Many older adults feel that pain is just a natural part of the ageing process and do not seek medical treatment until the condition has worsened.

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  • Breakthrough may lead to rehabilitation options for people with physical disabilities

    Source: Medical News Today
    A compact, self-contained sensor recorded and transmitted brain activity data wirelessly for more than a year in early stage animal tests, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. In addition to allowing for more natural studies of brain activity in moving subjects, this implantable device represents a potential major step toward cord-free control of advanced prosthetics that move with the power of thought. The report is in the April 2013 issue of the Journal of Neural Engineering.

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  • Walking for 20 minutes a day can help teens quit smoking

    Source: Medical News Today
    Walking for just 20 minutes a day can help teenage smokers cut down on their smoking habit. Teens are even more likely to quit altogether if they participate in a smoking cessation/fitness program and increase the days on which they get at least 30 minutes of exercise.

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  • Losing Your "Sole": Is Barefoot Running Right For You?

    Source: Medical Breakthrough
    A Wake Forest University study finds up to 65 percent of runners suffers an overuse injury each year. More and more are looking for new ways to avoid these aches and pains. Now, there’s one trend that some swear by, but you may have to say goodbye to what many consider to be the most important piece of running gear.

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  • Teen baseball players benefit from docking technique to repair torn elbow ligament

    Source: Medical News Today
    A study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) found that a surgical procedure known as the "docking technique" to repair a torn elbow ligament in teenage athletes yielded favorable results. The outcomes were better than those in previously published reports on reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), also known as Tommy John surgery, in this age group and may be attributed to technique-specific factors, according to the study authors. The paper, titled, "The Docking Technique for Elbow Ulnar Collateral Ligament Insufficiency: Two-Year Follow Up in Adolescent Athletes," was presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in Chicago.

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  • Outcomes in tennis elbow significantly improved by PRP

    Source: Medical News Today
    Eighty-four percent of patients suffering from chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylar tendinopathy) reported significantly less pain and elbow tenderness at six months following platelet rich plasma (PRP) treatment, according to results from the largest, multi-center study, to date, on PRP and tennis elbow, presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Tennis elbow is a common, painful condition affecting approximately 1 to 2 percent of the population. In this study, 230 patients suffering from chronic tennis elbow who had failed traditional therapies were treated at 12 U.S. medical centers. Patients were randomized and received either an injection of PRP made from their own concentrated blood platelets, or a placebo, administered with an analgesic at the site of pain.

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  • ACL surgery techniques using double versus single bundle ligaments provide equal stability

    Source: Daily Rx
    Surgery for a blown anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) inside the knee is becoming more and more common. New techniques to perform the surgery are on the rise across the country. Damaged ACLs that were replaced using a double-bundle technique during surgery were as stable as patients who received the single-bundle technique, according to a study presented at a conference. In double-bundle, the new ligament has two parts whereas the single bundle just has one.

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  • Ask well: exercises for shoulder pain

    Source: NY Times
    You are certainly right that sore shoulders are common, especially as a person ages. About half of all middle-aged tennis players suffer from shoulder pain, according to a 2012 study in The British Journal of Sports Medicine, and youngsters aren’t immune either. The same study reported that about a quarter of competitive tennis players under 20 hurt their shoulders every year. Many of these injuries involve the rotator cuff, the group of muscles and tendons at the back of the shoulder that stabilize the joint. Studies show that forces equivalent to at least 120 percent of a person’s body weight slam through the rotator cuff during a typical tennis serve or baseball pitch. To withstand that pounding, the rotator cuff needs to be strong.

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  • 3-D system could prevent shoulder injuries in baseball pitchers

    Source: Science Daily
    A new 3-D motion detection system could help identify baseball pitchers who are at risk for shoulder injuries, according to a new study. The system can be used on the field, and requires only a laptop computer. Other systems that evaluate pitchers' throwing motions require cameras and other equipment and generally are confined to indoor use. Loyola University Medical Center sports medicine surgeon Pietro Tonino, MD, is a co-author of the study, published in the journal Musculoskeletal Surgery.

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